Ask Mike – Favorite Memory

What is one of your favorite memories from all your years around South Texas music?

Mike-with-Ted-Lacey-at-KK-Steakhouse-and-Saloon.JPGI went to work as the Operations Manager, Program Director and DJ at KOPY 1070 in Alice, Texas in 1977, and left for KBUC in San Antonio in August of 1983. In the late ’70s, George Strait’s brother and my friend, Buddy, called and asked if he could bring me a record George had recorded. The 45 record was “I Don’t Want To Talk It Over Anymore”. He brought the record to the station that afternoon… I played it the next day on my show, added it to the radio station playlist, and KOPY began playing George regularly. I told my DJs to announce the record as being recorded by George Strait, although the independent “D” label the song was on, didn’t give George credit as the singer. So KKYX is correct that they were the first station to play George on MCA Records, but KOPY was playing him long before that. When George decided to start his roping classic, he called and asked me to handle the promotion. By the way, when The Texas Dance Hall in San Antonio closed their doors a couple of years later, with George Strait as their last ever act, my friend George Strait called KBUC and asked personally for me to emcee the show! By myself. He didn’t want any other DJ on the stage that night. Thanks George!!! And one last note, I was booking George on some shows in the early days, and had him in Alice one night at the KC Hall. While we watched the boys run through their sound check that afternoon with George at the mic, Buddy asked me how big I thought his brother could be in his career. Not saying I’m a prophet, but I told Buddy that I thought George could be the top country recording artist of all time . . . I certainly take my hat off to George Strait. For being at the top of the stack, and for being a friend who doesn’t forget. Only wish he would record a song or two that I’ve written!!!

I played it the next day on my show, added it to the radio station playlist, and KOPY began playing George regularly. I told my DJs to announce the record as being recorded by George Strait, although the independent “D” label the song was on, didn’t give George credit as the singer. I played it the next day on my show, added it to the radio station playlist, and KOPY began playing George regularly. I told my DJs to announce the record as being recorded by George Strait, although the independent “D” label the song was on, didn’t give George credit as the singer.. I played it the next day on my show, added it to the radio station playlist, and KOPY began playing George regularly. I told my DJs to announce the record as being recorded by George Strait, although the independent “D” label the song was on, didn’t give George credit as the singer. So KKYX is correct that they were the first station to play George on MCA Records, but KOPY was playing him long before that. When George decided to start his roping classic, he called and asked me to handle the promotion. By the way, when The Texas Dance Hall in San Antonio closed their doors a couple of years later, with George Strait as their last ever act, my friend George Strait called KBUC and asked personally for me to emcee the show! By myself. He didn’t want any other DJ on the stage that night. Thanks George!!! And one last note, I was booking George on some shows in the early days, and had him in Alice one night at the KC Hall. While we watched the boys were run through their sound check that afternoon with George at the mic, Buddy asked me how big I thought his brother could be in his career. Not saying I’m a prophet, but I told Buddy that I thought George could be the top country recording artist of all time . . . I certainly take my hat off to George Strait. For being at the top of the stack, and for being a friend who doesn’t forget. Only wish he would record a song or two that I’ve written!!!

July 23, 1983 was a Saturday. Backed by the Lone Star Statesmen, at exactly 8 p.m., I stepped up to the mic at the J.K Northway Coliseum in Kingsville, Texas. And stepped into history as the first ever performer on the concert portion of the George Strait Roping Classic. We played a one hour set, followed by George with a one hour set, then We played the third one hour set, and George wrapped up the show with set number 4. Most acts open for George, but he and I shared the bill and I got to match him set for set. Richard Casanova played fiddle for George in those days, and I always used twin fiddles. Richard walked on stage and came up to me during my second number. He said “I like your song selection” and asked if I would mind if he sat in with us. I sent him over to ask Dutch Wells, my lead fiddle player. Richard played second and third fiddle with us for the rest of the night. Three fiddles and steel guitar. Wow!KOPY